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Last minute solutions

Last weekend I took off for a camping trip to Wilsons Promontory National Park accompanied by French Florent & David, and German Gundi. Usually I’m a bit more organized, but this time I really failed. It was my job to call the wilsons prom camping shop and see if we could hire some air mattresses. Because initially we only had one, which is obviously not enough to sleep four people. I called on Friday afternoon to find out no one was picking up the phone.

So I intended to call again during the drive there, early Saturday morning. Only I fell asleep, and woke up after we already drove a fair view kilometers in the park. For your information, this park is 50,000 hectares big, and has only one shop, the ‘general store’. The shop I meant to call was already far behind. We managed though. Two slept in the car, another girl and I in the tent on some rugs and sleeping bags, and the air mattress Florent managed to borrow, even though it was barely big enough to fit a toddler.

A rainy drive

The entire drive to the park, the rain poured down. When we arrived, the receptionist told us it was going to clear up soon though. And it fortunately did. With some clouds and a proper 25 degrees, it was not bad at all to encounter the walking tracks of The Prom. We started off with a short walk along the beach, and got a good first impression of the park. It is indeed beautiful. And all you see is nature. No restaurants, bars, shops, or even fences around the walking tracks. Amazing.

Everywhere you can find massive rocks, also on this beach. So we could have a bit of a play and climb up and down the rocks. While we were having lunch, A parrot landed next to our picnic table and was aiming for bread. He hopped down on our arms and picked the crumbs out of our hand.
Tongue Point

Our second route was the Tongue Point track. A 3.8km walk one way, which usually takes 2 hours, according to the map. We were quite fast though and after an hour we reached Tongue Point. An amazing rock formation, on some sort of an island. The advice is to not climb the rocks. We only read that afterwards, as we were already on top of the massive stones. In the meantime the sun came out, and gave an amazing glitter to the surface of the sea. The last track of the day was a short walk through the Lilly Pilly rainforest.

In the evening it was very hard to find a spot at the bbqs on the campsite. Some nice locals offered us a spot at their picnic table, and others shared their barbecue with us. De sun slowly set, by a red and pink colored sky, and the animals woke up from their sleeps. Wild wombats were everywhere, searching for food. They were quite big, and looked like mini bears. I jumped up when one stroked my leg, on its pass under the table.

We also saw a fox, and later the guys saw a massive snake at the beach. At this time Gundi and I were preparing a mini cake, made by timtams and matches, because it was Davids birthday at 12 o’clock. Neither of us really minded that we missed out on the snake. In the nighttime we heard wombats, and our neighbors had a big fight, where they often used the word ‘cunt’.

Mount Oberon

Sunday we walked a steep path, up to Mount Oberon. This walk took quite a while, and there was not much to see around. But then we reached the top, and saw a breathtaking, panoramic view. Surrounded by the sea, rocks, little islands and beaches. From this height everything looked tiny, even though we were only 558m above sea level. I tried to capture the beauty in photos, but they don’t really do justice.

The sun appeared again, and when we were finally down, it was pretty warm. Squeaky beach was our next destination, where the sand is so fine, that it makes a squeaky noise when you walk on it. The water is clear as glass, and you can easily distinguish every detail on the bottom. Surrounded by rocks, and a clear blue skye. It was almost time to head back to Melbourne, but not until we’d done the Wildlife Walk.

 

Kangaroos by dusk

Lucky as we were, exactly at the time we entered the park, we ran into a local photographer who told us everything we wanted to know about the park and the wildlife. Gundi and I got to see our snake after all. Two as a matter of fact, poisonous ones. A brown king and a tiger snake. Even though they were ‘babies’, as the local told us, we were watching every step after this, to not accidentally step on one. The park was mainly filled with kangaroos, but also emus and wallabies. Apparently there’s an entire group of emus, where as we only saw two. Still great!

All in all another wonderful travel experience. After more then one year, I’m still very impressed by the beauty of this country.

 

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