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After three amazing nights in Wilson’s Prom, we drove towards Frankston on Tuesday morning. Rain was pouring down, and it must have been tricky to drive this massive campervan through the stormy weather. In Somerville we called it a day and stayed here for one night.

 

Our coffee stop on the day after was in Mornington, a cozy little town. I hadn’t been here before and was pleasantly surprised by the look of it. We did some shopping and walked up and down the main street. My dad found a place that was called ‘Lekker Lekker’, which is Dutch for ‘Yummy Yummy’. It turned out to be owned by a Dutch guy, selling Belgian chips (wíth mayonnaise, as we Dutchies like our chips) and Dutch donuts. He has been here for 15 years and set up this business. It seemed very popular amongst tourist and Dutch immigrants.

 

A little walk on the beach taught us Mornington has some painted beach houses. It didn’t compare to the houses on Brighton Beach though. Afterwards we continued the trip, and stopped in Dromana for two nights; a very quiet little town. For my sister’s twelfth birthday we drove to Rosebud and did minigolf and bowling here. We were very lucky with the weather, as the sky was clear and it was very sunny. Tapas for dinner in Two Buoys, the only nice-looking restaurant in Dromana.

 

Next stop on our route was Sorrento, and while we thought we parked very considerate, the Sorrento shire fined us for ‘not facing direction of travel’. On the opposite site we would’ve had to take three spaces, so I think it’s dull. Anyway, lesson learned. Fortunately Sorrento was a lovely town. From here we took the ferry to Queen’s Cliff, a 45-minute trip to bridge the gap. Again amazing weather, and we were even able to spot dolphins from a distance. A moment of true happiness.

 

Driving west from Queen’s Cliff, towards the long awaited Great Ocean Road. My parents were excited, as it was their first time and they’d heard so much about it. Highly impressed by the views along the coastline, we made our first stop in Lorne, next to the beach. It was another beautiful autumn day, and my brother and sister even got me to swim in the ocean. With clenched teeth and goose bumps all over, but I did it. That afternoon it was time for the next place and my dad drove us to Apollo Bay. Time for some old-school pinball sessions in the game room of the campsite.

 

On Sunday we viewed the Cape Otway light station, apparently ‘Australia’s most important lighthouse’. We were able to read all about Australia’s history with the world wars. The place had a bunker, and we could read all about morse code and radar. There was also a little hut with all aboriginal artefacts. Dale, an Australian guide, told us about the aboriginal history of Victoria. Sadly there are no more indigenous people left in this ‘country’*. The last one passed away 130 years ago. Dale let us have a go on the didgeridoo and then showed us how it’s properly done. Meanwhile the rain outside was pouring again and a bonfire was lit.

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View from Cape Otway lighthouse

On the way though Cape Otway national park, we spotted quite a few koalas. Two of them were awake and moving. That’s a unique experience, as they sleep 20 hours a day.

 

That night it was time for me to return to Melbourne. So I’m back in the city life, where the traffic never stops. It was a pleasure, and I’m counting down for the next trip.

 

* The aboriginal map of Australia shows all the countries and languages of the indigenous tribes

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One comment on “The Peninsula & GOR
  1. Hans(Dad) says:

    Your english has improved, so much that I sometimes need a dictionary.
    It’s really funny to read your stories from your point of view. Keep writing, it’s catching!

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